HIV/AIDS: What You Can do as Individual and as a Church

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What can you do? How can you make the difference? Firstly, always start with what you already have. It’s a scriptural principle. God’s work done in God’s way never lacks God’s supplies, as Hudson Taylor, the famous missionary to china once said. So what is God calling you to do? What has he laid on your heart?

You need neither funds nor large team to start. It costs nothing to care for a friend or neighbor, or to talk to your own children and colleagues about HIV and AIDS, or to include HIV issues in your church teaching, programme, work training schemes, or school curriculum. Together we can make real difference.

You may not be able to save the whole world but you can save someone getting HIV somewhere. You may not be able to help all those with HIV or orphaned by it, but you can give practical help and encouragement to a few and you can get involved in other projects that are already running. But do it all in fellowship with others. Such work can be stressful, draining and lonely and you will need people supporting you too.

What about larger projects? Thousands of programmes have been developed, countless papers published and millions of dollars expended in the struggle against HIV/AIDS. Yet spread of the pandemic rapidly continues.  Many governments and NGO agencies now recognize that their strategies are failing to stem the tide, yet continue to pump money into condom distribution alone and one-off awareness campaigns, neither of which address related problems such as poverty, education, the right of the women, and broader lifestyle questions.

Look around you; there is certainly something you can, no matter how small. Do something to day.

To know more about FCS  HIV response project and how to partner with us, contact fcsaid4life@gmail.com or call Mr Zakka; 08065555577, 08065555588. Visit http://www.fcsaid4life.org

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AIDS and YOU: Nowhere To Go

By Patrick Dixon

Is it Really Worse Than Cancer?

Imagine that you go the doctor because you have been feeling very run down and tired for the last few weeks. He sends you to the clinic where they do one or two tests. Before you know what is happening they have rushed you up to the ward. They do some more tests and everyone runs around looking very worried.

Then the doctor comes in and tells you that you are seriously ill and you will need to have a big operation tomorrow. He says you will be in for at least a week. Two days later you have a very rare form of cancer. It is very advanced and the outlook is terrible.

Your whole world has fallen apart in an instant: all your hopes and dreams for the future have been dashed. It cannot really be true. It is hard to take in: your plans for training, a job, a home of your own, maybe to get married and have children have been crushed.

Your parents are beside each other with worry and grief. What kind of a world is it where children die before their parents? It is like whole natural order has been turned upside down.

No Where to go

Feeling Suicidal

But AIDS can seem worse than any of this. What would you do if you went to give blood and a few days later a letter came asking you to re-attend, and when you got back a man there tell you that your blood has been tested positive for HIV?

Sometimes I asked a class at school this same question and many people tell me that they would commit suicide. They could not face the thought of everyone wondering how they had got it. How could they tell Dad? Could they tell him about using drugs, or having been with many women, or being gay and having sex with lots of other boys and men?

Many people do feel like committing suicide and some actually do, just after finding out about AIDS or an early infection, which is why so much care and support is needed after someone has been told. A friend of mine who is a doctor was shocked one day to wake up in the morning and find that someone had gassed himself with the exhaust. He had discharged himself against advice from the AIDS ward just a few hours previously. He could not face the thought of life with AIDS.

Do not stigmatize or judge HIV positive people, they need your care more. They can live their normal life and fulfill their destiny. Support an AIDS patient today.